Pelvic Floor

Pelvic floor muscle exercises, also known as Kegels, are a well-known method of strengthening the pelvic floor muscles. They have been widely used as a non-invasive and effective way to improve the function of the pelvic floor muscles, and provide relief for many conditions such as incontinence and pelvic pain. In this article, we will discuss the importance of pelvic floor muscle exercises and how they can improve your health.

The Importance of Pelvic Floor Muscle Exercises:

Pelvic floor muscle exercises help strengthen the muscles that support the bladder, uterus, and rectum. These muscles are responsible for controlling urine flow, supporting the pelvic organs, and regulating bowel movements. Weak pelvic floor muscles can result in a range of symptoms such as urinary incontinence, fecal incontinence, pelvic pain, and sexual dysfunction. Pelvic floor muscle exercises help improve the strength and tone of these muscles, which in turn can improve bladder and bowel control, reduce pelvic pain, and improve sexual function.

Performing Pelvic Floor Muscle Exercises:

The first step in performing pelvic floor muscle exercises is to identify the correct muscles. One way to do this is to contract the muscles you use to stop urination mid-stream. Once you have identified the correct muscles, you can perform Kegel exercises by contracting and relaxing the pelvic floor muscles repeatedly. Start with holding the contraction for a few seconds and gradually increase the duration of the hold as the muscles become stronger. It is recommended to perform at least 10 repetitions of Kegels three times a day.

Pelvic Floor Muscle Exercises and Women's Health:

Pelvic floor muscle exercises are particularly important for women, especially during pregnancy and after childbirth. During pregnancy, the pelvic floor muscles are put under extra pressure, which can result in weakness and urinary incontinence. Pelvic floor muscle exercises can help prepare for labor and delivery, and prevent problems after childbirth. They can also help alleviate vaginal pain and discomfort after delivery. For women who are postmenopausal, pelvic floor muscle exercises can help reduce the risk of prolapse and improve sexual function.

Pelvic floor muscle exercises are a simple and effective way to improve the function of the pelvic floor muscles and improve overall health. By performing Kegels regularly, individuals can improve bladder and bowel control, reduce pelvic pain, and improve sexual function. For women, pelvic floor muscle exercises are especially important during pregnancy and after childbirth, and can help prevent problems such as incontinence and prolapse. Contact a pelvic physiotherapist to learn more about how pelvic floor muscle exercises can improve your health.

 

 

Pelvic Floor Physiotherapy

Pelvic Health Physiotherapists have post-graduate education and specialized certification to qualify for their distinction, which is registered with the College of Physiotherapists.

Your Pelvic Health Physiotherapist will assess and treat conditions related to the muscles, fascia, ligaments and nerves in the pelvis. Pelvic Health Physiotherapy involves regaining optimal function of your pelvic floor and pelvic region, achieving healthy bladder and bowel control, ideal muscle strength and pelvic organ support, and pain free (sexual) function.  Treatment may include:

  • Myofascial Release Therapy
  • Strengthen and Restore Muscle Length
  • Muscle Strengthening Exercises with Manual Facilitation
  • Trigger Point Release
  • Condition Diastasis Function
  • Mobilization Joints of the Lumbar Spine, Coccyx and Hips
  • Home Care Program / Education
  • Biofeedback and Electro Stimulation (pain free)

Our pelvic floor physiotherapists have trained developed an advanced expertise in this field.  Remember, this can affect both women and men. For any questions, please do not hesitate to contact one of our pelvic floor physiotherapists.

What is the Pelvic Floor?

What is the Pelvic Floor? 

Regardless of your age or gender, having a pelvic floor issue can be difficult to live with, and a good spot to start is to understand the pelvic floor?  Everyone has a diagphram and also a pelvic floor. We need to achieve optimal balance the pelvic floor to have it function properly. Little might you know that your pelvic floor is used when we urinate, relieve our bowels and also to enjoy intimacy and sexual relations. Having an imbalance in the pelvic floor can lead to stress and frustration.  We are here to support a healthy pelvic floor.

The pelvic floor is a group of muscles that sit at the very bottom of your pelvis in a hammock type fashion; spanning from the coccyx and sacrum in the back to the pelvic bones along the sides and the pubic bones in the front. The pelvic floor muscles have a big job to do: they hold up all the organs directly above (the bladder, uterus, rectum and prostate), and also surround the openings of the urethra, rectum and in women, the vagina.

Conditions Related to Pelvic Floor

Conditions Related to Pelvic Floor

Pelvic / Back Pain - both men and women can experience unexplained pain in the pelvic area leading to uncomfortable and chronic conditions.

Bladder Dysfunction - can be the inability to hold or void completely, sometimes involuntary incontinence, 

Bowel Dysfunction - presents itself as constipation or difficulty evacuating, could be pain or burning sensation along with fecal incontinence.

Prenatal / Postnatal Care - in preparation for birth and postnatal we can support you with a health recovery, dealing with core strength and perineal training,  diastasis recti and pelvic floor training.

Post Surgury Rehabilitation - often patients might have pelvic surgery such as Prostatectomy, Pelvic Reconstruction, Laparotomy/laparoscopy, Cesarean section or Hernia Repair / Prolapse

Pediatric / Children Health - can present as either constipation or bed wetting, with children not often being able to express themselves, parents can look for these symptoms.

What are Pelvic Floor Dysfunctions?

What are Pelvic Floor Dysfunction?

Pelvic Floor dysfunction can happen for a variety of different reasons, although most cases occur because the pelvic muscles are not functioning as they are meant to in balance. In some conditions, the muscle that form the pelvic floor are OVER active and contracting to create tight short muscles.  And the other side of conditions involve muscles that have become weak or lengthened and no longer support good health. This can lead to a variety of pathology may lead to pelvic floor dysfunction, affecting women, men and children.

Short and Tight Pelvic Floor Muscles , The muscles of the pelvic floor may shorten in response to something such as an abdominal or pelvic surgery, or painful menstruation. The tight and short muscles are usually associated with urgency, urge incontinence, dyspareunia (pain during sex), chronic pelvic pain, painful bladder syndrome (interstitial cystitis), pudendal neuralgia, vaginismus, vulvodynia, and chronic prostatis.

Long and Weak Pelvic Floor Muscles, For different reasons the muscles of the pelvic floor may be generally weak, or become ‘stretched out’. This muscle lengthening and weakness may develop, for example, after carrying and delivering a baby, or chronic coughing. This presentation is most commonly associated with incontinence (stress urinary incontinence, or urge urinary incontinence) and pelvic organ prolapse. 

How can postpartum pelvic physiotherapy aid recovery after childbirth?

After childbirth, many women experience pain and discomfort in the pelvic area due to the physical stress of labor and delivery. Postpartum pelvic physiotherapy is a specialized type of physiotherapy that can help women to recover from these symptoms and to regain their strength and function.

The physiotherapist will conduct a thorough assessment to determine the cause of the pain and create a personalized treatment plan. The treatment plan may include exercises to strengthen and relax the pelvic floor muscles, manual therapy to release muscle tension, and biofeedback to help patients to improve the coordination and control of their pelvic floor muscles.

In addition to these interventions, the physiotherapist will also provide the patient with education and advice on how to manage their pain, including advice on posture, activity modification, and relaxation techniques. The physiotherapist may also provide advice on exercises and positions that can be used to help with breastfeeding and caring for a baby.

Postpartum physiotherapy can help women to regain their strength and function after childbirth, and to alleviate pain and discomfort in the pelvic area. It can also help to improve bladder and bowel control and sexual function. The physiotherapist will create a personalized treatment plan based on the patient's specific condition and symptoms.

Overall, postpartum pelvic physiotherapy can aid recovery after childbirth by helping women to alleviate pain and discomfort, regain strength and function, and improve bladder and bowel control and sexual function. It can also provide education and advice on how to manage pain and care for a baby.

Prostate Cancer: Frequently Asked Questions

Prostate cancer is a common condition that affects many men, particularly as they age. If you have been diagnosed with prostate cancer, or suspect that you may be at risk for the condition, you likely have many questions. In this article, we'll answer some of the most frequently asked questions about prostate cancer.

  1. What is Prostate Cancer?
    Prostate cancer is a condition that occurs when cells in the prostate gland grow uncontrollably, forming a tumor. It can spread to other parts of the body if left untreated.
  2. What are the Symptoms of Prostate Cancer?
    In the early stages, prostate cancer may not cause any symptoms. As the condition progresses, symptoms may include difficulty urinating, blood in the urine or semen, and pain in the back, hips, or pelvis.
  3. How is Prostate Cancer Diagnosed?
    Prostate cancer can be diagnosed through a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test and a digital rectal exam. Additional tests, such as a biopsy, may also be used to help diagnose the condition.
  4. What are the Treatment Options for Prostate Cancer?
    There are several treatment options available for prostate cancer, depending on the stage and severity of the condition. Treatment may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, hormone therapy, or a combination of these approaches.
  5. Can Prostate Cancer be Prevented?
    While it may not be possible to prevent prostate cancer entirely, there are steps that can be taken to reduce the risk of developing the condition. These steps may include maintaining a healthy weight, getting regular exercise, and eating a healthy diet.
  6. How Often Should Men Be Screened for Prostate Cancer?
    The American Cancer Society recommends that men discuss their individual risk of prostate cancer with their healthcare provider and make an informed decision about screening. Screening may involve a PSA blood test and a digital rectal exam.

Prostate cancer can be a serious and potentially life-threatening condition, but there are many effective treatment options available. By understanding the symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment options for prostate cancer, men can take steps to manage their risk and improve their overall health. If you have any concerns or questions about prostate cancer, be sure to speak to your healthcare provider.

Can physiotherapy help with incontinence?

Yes, physiotherapy can help with incontinence. Incontinence is the inability to control the bladder or bowels, and can be caused by weak pelvic floor muscles, nerve damage, or other factors. Pelvic floor physiotherapy is a specialized type of physiotherapy that can help to alleviate the symptoms of incontinence by strengthening the pelvic floor muscles and improving muscle control.

Pelvic floor physiotherapy typically includes a combination of exercises, manual therapy, and biofeedback. The exercises are designed to strengthen the pelvic floor muscles, improve bladder and bowel control, and alleviate pain and discomfort. Manual therapy involves the use of hands-on techniques to manipulate and massage the muscles and tissues in the pelvic area. Biofeedback is a technique that uses electronic monitoring to provide feedback on the activity of the pelvic floor muscles, helping the patient to learn how to properly engage and relax these muscles.

In addition to these interventions, the physiotherapist will also provide the patient with education and advice on how to manage their incontinence, including advice on posture, activity modification, and lifestyle changes.

Overall, physiotherapy can be an effective treatment for incontinence by targeting the underlying cause of the incontinence, strengthening the pelvic floor muscles and improving muscle control, and providing education and advice on how to manage the incontinence.

What is pelvic floor physiotherapy and how can it help me?

Pelvic floor physiotherapy is a specialized type of physiotherapy that focuses on the muscles, nerves, and connective tissue in the pelvic area. The pelvic floor muscles support the bladder, uterus, and rectum and can become weak or tight due to pregnancy, childbirth, surgery, and other factors. Pelvic floor physiotherapy can help:

  1. Pelvic floor muscles: These are a group of muscles located in the pelvic region that support the bladder, uterus, and rectum and help to control bowel and bladder function.
  2. Bladder: The bladder is a muscular sac in the lower abdomen that stores urine until it is eliminated from the body.
  3. Uterus: The uterus is a muscular organ located in the pelvic region that supports the growth and development of a fetus during pregnancy.
  4. Rectum: The rectum is the last part of the large intestine, which stores and eliminates solid waste from the body.
  5. Pregnancy: Pregnancy is the state of being pregnant, in which a woman carries a developing fetus inside her uterus.
  6. Childbirth: Childbirth is the process by which a baby is born, typically involving labor and delivery.
  7. Surgery: Surgery is a medical procedure that involves the use of surgical instruments to cut, repair or remove tissue from the body.
  8. Bladder and bowel control: Bladder and bowel control refer to the ability to hold and release urine and feces at the appropriate times.
  9. Pain and discomfort: Pain and discomfort refer to physical sensations that can be caused by injury, illness, or other factors.
  10. Sexual function: Sexual function refers to the ability to have sexual intercourse and experience pleasure and satisfaction.
  11. Pelvic organ prolapse: Pelvic organ prolapse is a condition in which one or more of the pelvic organs (such as the uterus or bladder) drops from its normal position and pushes against the vaginal walls.
  12. Pelvic floor physiotherapy exercises: These are a set of exercises that are specifically designed to strengthen and relax the pelvic floor muscles, improve bladder and bowel control, alleviate pain and discomfort, and improve sexual function.
  13. Manual therapy: Manual therapy is a type of physiotherapy that involves the use of hands-on techniques to manipulate and massage the muscles and tissues in the pelvic area.
  14. Biofeedback: Biofeedback is a technique that uses electronic monitoring to provide feedback on the activity of the pelvic floor muscles, helping the patient to learn how to properly engage and relax these muscles.
  

Pelvic Organ Prolapse Treatment: Your Ultimate Guide

Pelvic organ prolapse is a common condition that occurs when the pelvic organs, such as the bladder, uterus, or rectum, slip out of their normal position and into the vaginal canal. This can cause discomfort, pain, and urinary or bowel issues. In this ultimate guide, we'll explore some of the most effective treatments for pelvic organ prolapse, including lifestyle changes, pelvic physiotherapy, and surgery.

FAQs:

What are some lifestyle changes that can help with pelvic organ prolapse?

Making lifestyle changes such as losing weight, quitting smoking, and avoiding heavy lifting or straining can help prevent pelvic organ prolapse from getting worse. It's also important to stay hydrated and consume a healthy diet high in fiber.

What is pelvic physiotherapy and how can it help with pelvic organ prolapse?

Pelvic physiotherapy is a non-invasive treatment for pelvic organ prolapse that can help improve pelvic muscle tone and function. This type of therapy can include pelvic floor muscle exercises, biofeedback, and manual therapy.

When is surgery necessary for pelvic organ prolapse?

In some cases, surgery may be necessary to correct severe pelvic organ prolapse. This can involve repairing or removing the affected organ, using mesh or other surgical techniques.

What are the risks and benefits of surgical treatment for pelvic organ prolapse?

Surgical treatment for pelvic organ prolapse has both risks and benefits. Risks can include bleeding, infection, and organ damage, while benefits can include improved quality of life, reduced symptoms, and greater comfort.

Can pelvic organ prolapse be prevented?

While pelvic organ prolapse cannot always be prevented, making lifestyle changes such as those mentioned above can help reduce your risk of developing the condition.

Pelvic organ prolapse can be a challenging and uncomfortable condition, but it can be treated with a variety of techniques, from lifestyle changes to pelvic physiotherapy and surgery. By following the tips and guidelines outlined in this ultimate guide, you can take steps to prevent pelvic organ prolapse from getting worse and find relief from your symptoms. Remember to speak to your healthcare provider if you have any concerns or questions about your treatment options.